Future Exhibitions

The Harn Museum of Art is dedicated to offering as much information as possible about our upcoming exhibitions in order to assist in planning your visit and to encourage collaboration with university and community partners. We will continue to update our future exhibition pages as plans and programs are solidified.

Upcoming

"Gilt Wood Bodhisattva," 18th century, museum purchase, funds provided by friends of the Harn Museum and the Robert H. and Kathleen M. Axline Acquisition Endowment

Tempus Fugit:: 光陰矢の如し:: Time Flies

December 21, 2019 - December 12, 2021
David A. Cofrin Asian Art Wing

This exhibition is a reflection on time and its many meanings. This broad concept has been applied to the Japanese art collections at the Harn Museum as an investigative tool to look at how time has been measured in the visual record, how art objects can portray several moments in time, and how artists experience time during the production of their work. The celebration of the natural world, through life cycles and the acknowledgment of mortality and the change of the seasons, is also a recurring theme in Japanese art and celebrated within this exhibition.

Yoruba artist, Nigeria, "Staffs for Ogboni Society (edan Ogboni)," 18th-19th century, Collection of Drs. John and Nicole Dintenfass

Peace, Power and Prestige: Metal Arts in Africa

March 17, 2020 - November 30, 2020
S.F.I. Rotunda in honor of Haskel Hess + Dorothy and E. Robert Langley Foyer

This exhibition will explore the roles of metal objects in sustaining, unifying and enhancing life in African communities, while demonstrating the aesthetic and expressive power of metal arts. Peace, Power and Prestige will include a diverse range of iron, brass, bronze, gold, copper, silver, and alloyed works created by artists in West, Central, South and East Africa, between the 12th and 21st centuries.

Maggie Taylor, "And what Alice found there," 2017, courtesy of the artist

Dreaming Alice: Maggie Taylor Through the Looking Glass

April 5, 2020 - January 3, 2021
Gladys Gracy Harn Exhibition Hall

Maggie Taylor has garnered widespread attention for her breakthrough use of technology in her art. Taylor's contemporary photographs make aesthetically innovative use of 19th-century photography (daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes), as well as scanned images of insects, dolls, period etchings, and the flora and fauna of the Victorian era to create 62 new photographs inspired by Lewis Carroll's novel Through the Looking Glass, and What Alice Found There.